Global

COVID-19 Around the World 5.21.20

by Stranger’s Guide

Each week, we’re taking a look at how COVID-19 is impacting life around the world. Here’s the roundup for this week:

India

Mumbai, a city of 20 million, now accounts for 20 percent of India’s coronavirus infections and nearly 25 percent of its deaths—and doctors say the key reason is the megacity’s density, particularly its vast slum districts where people often live eight to a room (New York Times)

Madagascar

Madagascar has announced its first COVID-19 death, two months after the coronavirus was first detected in the island country of 26 million people in the Indian Ocean. An official from the anti-coronavirus task team said the patient was a 57-year-old hospital worker. Madagascar has 304 reported cases of COVID-19. (France 24)

Saint Lucia

St. Lucia will reopen its borders to travelers on June 4 after its prime minister Allen Chastanet said it has curbed the spread of COVID-19. Chastanet said all 18 of the island’s confirmed coronavirus cases had successfully recovered. Travelers would have to undergo a COVID-19 test, use masks and have frequent temperature checks. (Caribbean National Weekly)

USA

Tempers are flaring in Provincetown, Massachusetts over how best to reopen the small seaside town—or whether to open to tourists at all. It’s one of the top LGBTQ travel destinations in the United States, bringing in annual revenue of $200m, but what makes the resort town of 3,000 special also makes it vulnerable to coronavirus, as in the summer the population swells to 50,000. (Boston Globe)

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Europe

Giger’s Otherworldly Bar

H.R. Giger, who died four years ago, was a Swiss painter known for his otherworldly, airbrushed images fusing humans and machines. Giger was a key part of the visual effects team that won an Oscar for Alien. The picturesque Alpine town of Chur, Switzerland, is the unlikely home to a bar-cum-museum in Giger’s honor, which one writer described as a “cavernous, skeletal structure covered by double arches of vertebrae that crisscross the vaulted ceiling of an ancient castle.”